Digital Natives – Myth, threat or opportunity?

Sitting down with digital natives, and reviewing the current thinking, Richard Waring of Catalyst Market Research provides insight.

The term ‘Digital Natives’ was coined by Marc Prensky of Harvard and Yale nearly 15 years ago to describe the emerging generation who have not had to adapt to digital. Supposedly it’s wired into their DNA from birth – the iGeneration. If that’s not you, then you’re classed as a digital immigrant, worrying whether you and your business is adapting fast enough. Darwin never said ‘the strongest survives’, what he said was ‘the most adaptable to change survives’.

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David Kelly joins forces with Catalyst Market Research

David Kelly joins forces with Catalyst Market Research

David Kelly has joined forces as a consultant with Catalyst Market Research. Previously David was Marketing & Sales Director of Aer Lingus, Commercial Director at Independent News & Media and Head of Business Intelligence at eircom.

David brings extensive expertise in statistical modelling, advanced analytics and the rapidly emerging area of big data to the expanding offering from Catalyst Market Research. His background in analysing customer data for improving customer experience spans many industries including retail, airlines, media and agency. David specialises in optimising the marketing infrastructure in branded businesses by developing best of breed process, internal structures and external supplier relationships. 

“We are delighted to have David join our expanding team. He brings a wealth of commercial, marketing and insight knowledge, experience and ability to Catalyst which further strengthens our analytical capabilities and offering to clients” said, Dan McGuinness and Richard Waring, Partners at Catalyst Market Research.

Promotions in the Recession's Wake

The recession the world has just been through is not the first nor last but its severity and length makes its lasting impact very different from most others. Every recession forces consumers to change or suspend behaviour, normally reverting once the worst is past. This time a more permanent change has been ingrained in behaviour and choice, as consumers have become conditioned to seek out value and discounting has become part of their DNA. 

There is in fact a precedent in the American crash of the 1930s, where the change in consumer behaviour was so dramatic that it took a generation to re-adjust back. But no matter how deep or long any recession may be, fundamental consumer aspirations eventually rise to the surface again, as they are now. Austerity may have forced many to cut non-essentials, but throughout the recession the premium and luxury sectors (from LVMH to M&S food) continued to perform strongly, demonstrating that shoppers never lose that desire to aspire.

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